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Pegasus Elliot Mackenzie Publishers Ltd
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leighvtwersky
 14 Aug 2008, 22:12 #41916 Reply To Post
Their entry in the Writer's Handbook 2007 has an added author's rating: [b]liable to ask authors to contribute to production costs.
HPRW
 07 Sep 2008, 14:48 #43614 Reply To Post
Quote: dannyg, Saturday, 2 Aug 2008 18:30
I don't know anything about this one, Annie, but it's becoming more common for smaller publishers (like Legend) to offer both traditional and POD services so I wouldn't be automatically suspicious unless they try to get you to pay anything up front.


Pegasus is a vanity press, nothing else. Don't publish with them if you want your books, and your writing, to do well, or if you're not prepared to pay over-the-odds for boxes full of a poorly-edited, probably-unmarketable book.

As for smaller publishers offering both traditional and POD services: there are several problems there.

POD is not the same as self-publishing. POD is a printing technology and NOT a business model. Lots of publishers, large and small, use POD: sometimes to keep their backlists in print, sometimes to avoid the cost of a print-run when they're short on cash (which is, in itself, a red flag if you're looking for a publisher--if they can't afford to print their own books, they are likely to be in trouble).

When a small press asks its writers to make a financial contribution to the publication of their own books, this is a clear conflict of interests.

Publishers should make their money by selling books to readers: not by selling books to their authors, or by getting their authors to pay for printing, editing and suchlike. Vanity presses often make the claim that what they do is subsidy publishing or cooperative publishing, but it's really just an attempt to disguise themselves as something a little more reputable: many have started off as perfectly reputable commercial publishers, but then discovered that they make more money by getting their authors to pay for the printing process than they make by making the effort to publish and promote the books to a wider audience.

Now, I don't know about Legend, specifically. I've not checked them out at all. But I have to say that if ANY publisher asks for a writer to make any financial contribution to the publication process then the writer will walk away from the deal, if he or she has any sense at all.

That's not to say that self-publishing is a Bad Thing: in fact, it can be a good thing when done under the right circumstances. But make sure that you really are self-publishing, and not falling for a vanity publisher in disguise.

Self-published books will have the author's own imprint on the copyright page, and an ISBN registered under the author's name. The company which prints the book will not be listed as the publisher in the book, on Amazon, or anywhere else.

Please, everyone: research your publishers properly BEFORE you submit to them, and save yourself the time, money and heartache of getting involved with a vanity press.

So ends my sermon. I'll try to not lecture next time, I promise.
Apologies for any typos I might let slip by: I've developed a problem with my vision and I've not got used to it yet.

How Publishing Really Works
stretcher
 21 Nov 2008, 15:50 #50233 Reply To Post
Seems a bit of an old thread but PEM in Cambridge - They asked me eventually for £2700 - over ten months. I found another author who had paid £2900. If you want to know what you get look google for Delta One by Sheela Reith. I've seen much better work presented here even with bad review marks for presentation. One part looked like a chapter was missing. If you are desperate go ahead but you will pay this sort of money - see your book on Amazon and not get any money for 12 months after the book is released. They may argue this is normal. They are not crooks - it is a business but I decided against.
When a finger points to the sky, only a fool looks at the finger - Amelie
Annie Wicking
 21 Nov 2008, 17:01 #50245 Reply To Post
Quote: stretcher, Friday, 21 Nov 2008 15:50
Seems a bit of an old thread but PEM in Cambridge - They asked me eventually for £2700 - over ten months. I found another author who had paid £2900. If you want to know what you get look google for Delta One by Sheela Reith. I've seen much better work presented here even with bad review marks for presentation. One part looked like a chapter was missing. If you are desperate go ahead but you will pay this sort of money - see your book on Amazon and not get any money for 12 months after the book is released. They may argue this is normal. They are not crooks - it is a business but I decided against.


Thank you for adding your comment to this interesting view on self-publishing.

Everyones viewpoint is valid, including yours HPRW.

I'm more that surprise to find you here, HPRW, but I'm glad you find YWO such a helpful site for advertising your blog. So you have found a good use for it after all. especially after telling me your views on what you thought of it as a site for helping for new writers

This post was last edited by Annie Wicking, 21 Nov 2008, 17:11
The worst thing that can happen to a writer is to become a Writer. Mary McCarthy

The fact is, writing can be done only during the time when one ought to be doing something else. Isabel Paterson

HJW
 21 Nov 2008, 17:58 #50252 Reply To Post
Woud you like a spoon, Annie?
Are you hooked?

Oh blogger

Annie Wicking
 22 Nov 2008, 08:45 #50304 Reply To Post
Quote: HJW, Friday, 21 Nov 2008 17:58
Woud you like a spoon, Annie?


A spoon, HJW? Why, my dear, when a pen is mightier than a sword...

I hope you have a great weekend and get lots of writing done.

The worst thing that can happen to a writer is to become a Writer. Mary McCarthy

The fact is, writing can be done only during the time when one ought to be doing something else. Isabel Paterson

RobertB
 22 Nov 2008, 19:14 #50357 Reply To Post
You probably want a long spoon if you insist on supping with some publishers!
wewakeire
 12 Dec 2008, 14:19 #52529 Reply To Post
Quote: RobertB, Saturday, 22 Nov 2008 19:14
You probably want a long spoon if you insist on supping with some publishers!


I self-published some novels through Lightning Source last year. They had easy to use templates and free set up as a special offer. The minimum print run is 50.
I bought my own ISBNs and thus got my own imprint.
I deposited 6 copies of each book with the British Library as per statutory requirements.
My total spend per book was circa 200 pounds for 50 copies.
In contrast, Lulu (the cheapest alternative) would have cost me about 300 pounds just to fulfill my statutory obligation and leave me with ten or twelve copies to hand around or send for review.
My books are on Google Books, Amazon, Blackwells and so on. I did't bother to do any self-promotion so I didn't make any money on this. Still, friends and family have copies of my books. I also got a British Library card out of the deal.
I still have 6 ISBNs left and was thinking of doing some community publishing. There might be funding available for that sort of thing- or, who knows, I might bump into someone really worthwhile to publish.
Anyway, the point I'm coming to is that you can get 50 copies of your book, along with an ISBN, Google and Amazon listings and so forth, all for about 200 quid.
Why bother with anything else unless you really can't format Word or don't know how to handle Photoshop essentials?
To be able to sell on Amazon, you need a heck of a lot of reviews. That means you've got to send out your books to high rated reviewers. So you need to keep printing & post costs down. I can't see any commercial service offering to actually post 30 copies of your work to the high rated reviewers in your genre complete with covering letter and so forth. Thus, the extra bucks they charge are a tax on stupidity. True self-publishing is nothing but vanity- or humiliation in my case- still one can go about it with a bit of nous.
Any thoughts?
Toddy
 16 Mar 2012, 14:58 #145818 Reply To Post
Quote: Annie Wicking, Saturday, 2 Aug 2008 17:25
They have asked to see my completed manuscript, which in itself is wonderful, but on an Amercian Forum they say this publishing company is a POD company.

I have looked on their website and can't see anywhere where they ask for money up front so I thought I'll ask you lot?



Don't bother with Pegasus Elliot Mackenzie i had to pay £2500 to have my book published & they have done nothing to promote it, i have only earn't £44 in just over a year
AnonymousAuthor
 23 May 2015, 10:07 #185384 Reply To Post
Hi,

I'm new to the community -- I too have some questions regarding Pegasus and I just wanted to bump this thread to see if anyone had signed with them? I'd be interested to know if anyone thought they got their money's worth (or not?)
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